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RSI - Repetitive Strain Injuries


General RSI Resources Diagnosis
Medical Aspects Prevention
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Editor: dr. Albert Benschop
Social & Behavioral Studies
MediaStudies
University of Amsterdam
Last modified: 13th September, 2013


Many computer workers have complaints that indicate Repetitive Strain Injuries (RSI), also called the mouse arm. RSI is an umbrella term for physical complaints that are generated by repetitive movements. The symptoms are pain complaints, tinglings of hands or wrists, deafness and loss of power, especially in neck, shoulders, arms, wrists and hands. Monotonous work, a bad attitude and stress facilitate the desease. RSI currently account for over 60 percent of workplace injuries. This page contains information resources on the causes, consequences and treatment of RSI, and on the measures you can take to prevent RSI.

General Resources

Index Diagnosis of RSI: Syndromes and Symptomes

Index Prevention of RSI

Index Treatment of RSI

Index Support Groups

Index Medical Aspects

Index Products & Services

BreakWare: Software for RSI prevention and recovery

SpeechWare Ergonomic Hardware: Keyboards, Pointers and Furniture

Advice and Consultancy

Index Mailing Lists

Index News Groups

Index Directories & Guides

Index


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